What exactly does a gynecologist do?

As for your vagina, you can completely leave that alone. Experts often compare the vagina to a self-cleaning oven for a reason; unless something is wrong, it cleans itself with discharge. No need to try to help it out with any products. That definitely includes douches, which can alter the pH of your vagina and lead to irritation and infection.

Discharge is totally normal, and it can change throughout your menstrual cycle. While some vaginal discharge is due to your vagina lubricating and cleaning itself, much of that discharge is actually cervical mucus, which can look different depending on what’s happening in your body.

While you could work out in silk underwear if you feel like being especially fancy, it’s really best to wear cotton because it allows more air to pass through, Dr. Coleman says. Again, you want to make it less likely for a ton of sweat to just sit there against your vulva, increasing your risk of developing a yeast infection, she says. That’s also why she recommends changing your underwear after you work out. Of course, you’re not guaranteed to get a yeast infection if you decide to lounge around for an episode of The Crown after a hard workout, but it’s best to get into the habit of changing as soon as you can, just to be safe, Dr. Coleman says.

A gynecologist is a doctor who specializes in women’s reproductive health. Obstetricians care for women during their pregnancy and just after the baby is born. They also deliver babies. An ob-gyn is trained to do all of these things.

Vaginal bleeding and discharge are a normal part of your menstrual cycle prior to menopause. … Vaginal symptoms may also be a sign of more serious problems, from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) to cancers of the reproductive tract. Gynecological symptoms may resemble other medical conditions or urological problems.

Gynaecology or gynecology (see spelling differences) is the medical practice dealing with the health of the female reproductive systems (vagina, uterus, and ovaries) and the breasts. … Its counterpart is andrology, which deals with medical issues specific to the male reproductive system.

When should I have my first gynecologic visit?

An obstetrician–gynecologist (ob–gyn) is a doctor who specializes in the health care of women. Girls should have their first gynecologic visit between the ages of 13 years and 15 years.
Is it normal to be nervous before the first visit?

It is normal to feel nervous about your first visit. It may help if you talk about it with your parents or someone else you trust. You may want to let your doctor know you are nervous. He or she can help put you at ease.
What should I expect at the first gynecologic visit?

The first visit may be just a talk between you and your doctor. You can find out what to expect at future visits and get information about how to stay healthy. You also may have certain exams.

Your doctor may ask a lot of questions about you and your family. Some of them may seem personal, such as questions about your menstrual period or sexual activities (including vaginal, oral, or anal sex). If you are concerned about confidentiality, you and your doctor should talk about it before you answer any questions. Much of the information you share can be kept confidential.
What exams are performed?

You may have certain exams at the first visit. If you choose, a nurse or family member may join you for any part of the exam. Most often, these exams are performed:

– General physical exam
– External genital exam

You usually do not need to have a pelvic exam at the first visit unless you are having problems, such as abnormal bleeding or pain. If you are sexually active, you may have tests for certain sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Most of the tests that teens need can be done by the doctor with a urine sample. You also may have certain vaccinations.
What happens during a general physical exam?

During the general exam, your height, weight, and blood pressure will be checked. You also will be examined for any health problems you may have.
What happens during an external genital exam?

In this exam, the doctor looks at the vulva. He or she may give you a mirror so that you can look at the vulva as well. This exam is a good way to learn about your body and the names for each part.
What are the pelvic exam and Pap test?

Even though you probably will not have a pelvic exam, you should know what one is. Another test that you will have later (at age 21 years) is a Pap test. This test checks for abnormal changes in the cervix that could lead to cancer.

The pelvic exam has three parts:

– Looking at the vulva
– Looking at the vagina and cervix with a speculum
– Checking the internal organs with a gloved hand

The doctor will use a speculum to look at your vagina and cervix. When you have a Pap test, a sample of cells is taken from your cervix with a small brush.

To check your internal organs, the doctor will place one or two gloved, lubricated fingers into the vagina and up to the cervix. The other hand will press on the abdomen from the outside.

Pelvic Exam and Pap Test
What are vaccinations?

Vaccinations or immunizations protect against certain diseases. The following vaccines are given to all young women aged 11–18 years on a routine basis:

– Tetanus–diphtheria–pertussis (Tdap) booster
– Human papillomavirus vaccine
– Meningococcal vaccine
– Influenza vaccine (yearly)

In addition to routine vaccines, special vaccines may be given to young women who are at an increased risk for certain diseases. Listed are some of these vaccines:

– Hepatitis A virus vaccine
– Pneumococcal vaccine

What special concerns can be discussed with my ob–gyn?

Many young women share the same health concerns. Most of these concerns are a normal part of growing up:

– Cramps and problems with menstrual periods
– Acne
– Weight
– Sex and sexuality
– Birth control
– STIs
– Alcohol, drugs, and smoking
– Emotional ups and downs

What can I do to stay healthy?

Making good lifestyle choices can help you to be strong and healthy for years to come:

– Maintain a healthy weight by eating a well-balanced diet and exercising often.
– Avoid smoking, drinking alcohol, and using illegal drugs.
– Seek help if you have emotional ups and downs or feel depressed.
– Use birth control if you are having sex and do not want to have a baby.
– Protect yourself from STIs by using a latex condom. Know your partners and limit their number.
– Keep up with routine exams, tests, and immunizations.

Glossary of Terms:

Birth Control: Prevention of pregnancy.
Cervix: The lower, narrow end of the uterus at the top of the vagina.
Condom: A thin sheath used to cover the penis during sex to prevent sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy.
Menstrual Period: The discharge of blood and tissue from the uterus that occurs when an egg is not fertilized (also called menstruation).
Obstetrician–Gynecologist (Ob–Gyn): A physician with special skills, training, and education in women’s health.
Pap Test: A test in which cells are taken from the cervix and vagina and examined under a microscope.
Pelvic Exam: A manual examination of a woman’s reproductive organs.
Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs): Infections that are spread by sexual contact.
Speculum: An instrument used to hold open the walls of the vagina.
Vagina: A tube-like structure surrounded by muscles leading from the uterus to the outside of the body.
Vulva: The external female genital area.

Company Information:
WWW: https://gynecologistvizag.com/
Doctor : Dr. Ramya Sadaram
Address : 57-1-11, Above Andhra Bank, Durga Nagar, Gavara Kanchara Palem, Kancharapalem, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh 530008
Phone : 09494402848 or book an appointment at https://gynecologistvizag.com/book-an-appointment/.

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