Running shoes guides

Buying the right running shoes for you is extremely important for getting the best results. Adidas don’t tend to change the Boston much with each annual update, and frankly why would they? This is an incredibly popular shoe and for good reason. The Boston 7 is a tremendous race-day option for pretty much any distance, with just enough Boost cushioning to keep the pep in your step over a marathon, but not so much that you’re carrying unnecessary weight when shooting for a PB in a 5K. Make sure to size up, because Adidas shoes tend to run small – what it calls a snug racing fit, many of us might refer to as uncomfortably tight. However, once you have the right size there are few shoes that will serve you better in your next race, and during all the training leading up to that race as well.

But there are certain shoes that I think have broad appeal and the Nike Zoom Streak XC is one of those shoes. I’ve been wearing the Streak XC for about three months and have run everything from a 5k race, duathlon, and track intervals ranging from 200m reps in 32 seconds to miles in 5:20. For any speed faster than a tempo effort, these racing shoes are perfect. With just the right blend of cushioning and responsiveness, I can run short intervals all the way to 10 mile races in comfort. Because of my over-pronation and tendency to get sore arches, I wouldn’t wear them for the half or marathon distance. Shorter races are a perfect candidate for this racer though.

Aside from the Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4%, of which more later, this is the best road racing shoe you can buy. The Reebok Floatride Run Fast is exceptionally light considering the decent chunk of cushioning on the bottom, which ensures your legs stay fresh through each race, and allows you to kick hard for the finish line. The cushioning on the Run Fast is made from the same Pebax material as is used for Nike’s ZoomX foam – found on the Pegasus Turbo and Vaporfly shoes. It provides a huge amount of bounce despite being very lightweight, which makes it perfect for holding your race pace over 10K and half marathon distances in particular. Some runners will also find that the Run Fast is a great marathon shoe, but others will prefer something offering a little more support for the full 42.2km.

Unsurprisingly, designs with more cushioning like the Brooks Ghost 10 and Brooks Glycerin 16 typically score higher in landing comfort. The usual formula for the best landing comfort is a balanced design that is not too cushy and not too firm. You need balanced cushioning to find consistent comfort. We find this with the Nike Pegasus 35, which scored near the top of our measure. Its secret is that it embeds Zoom Air units across the entirety of the midsole. Elements comprised of hollow EVA structures even seemed to cushion more than that of the versatile Cloud. That difference in sensation could be partially explained by the rigid speedboard, which gave more pop and stability to each stride. This put the X at the top of the category and helped earn it the Editors’ Choice award.

The Gel-Kayano has been on runners’ feet for over 25 years, and it remains Asics’ top-selling shoe. It’s a great everyday trainer, especially if you’re an overpronator. The stretchy woven mesh upper provides a close fit, while a medial plate and sturdy heel counter keep you from rolling onto your inner foot as you run. It’s a hefty shoe packed with the company’s latest proprietary tech, including FlyteFoam Propel and FlyteFoam Lyte, as well as Gel cushioning in the forefoot and heel. See more details on https://info4runners.com/.

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