Top places to see in New Zealand and eTA application

eTA application and New Zealand travel attractions : The Bay of Islands is one of the best places to go in New Zealand for fishing, sailing, and other watersports. The Bay of Islands is about three hours by car from Auckland. This gorgeous region is made up of 144 islands between Cape Brett and the Purerua Peninsula. What’s there to do in the Bay of Islands? Get on or in the water! Try scuba diving with Paihia Dive‘s intro-to-diving course. You will be ferried far out into the bay to explore a whole new underwater world. Or get up close and personal with the marine life in the Bay of Islands on a Fullers GreatSights Dolphin Eco Experience. You’ll get to view dolphins and whales from the boat and, if conditions allow, swim with wild dolphins. Don’t leave the Bay of Islands without seeing the Hole in the Rock, an opening in a rock formation that you can sail through when the tide is right.

The Coromandel Peninsula’s movie-worthy Cathedral Cove gets plenty of love, but Hot Water Beach is a local treasure worth cherishing too. With its golden sands and bubbling hot waters, this deserted piece of coastline is sure to enthral all travellers who spending some time familiarising themselves with the North Island’s natural beauty. Don’t forget to bring a shovel so you can scoop out your own thermal mineral water spring to dip into. The Hamilton Gardens is unique from any other you’ll find in New Zealand: unlike the ones in Queenstown, Wellington or Auckland, it is not a botanical garden in the strictest of terms. Rather, the 54-hectare (133.4-acre) park is a showcase of 21 gardens that symbolise the art and traditions of different civilisations, from Maori to European and Southeast Asian too.

Kaikoura, This small coastal town on the South Island is a haven for seafood lovers. You can spot fur seals, dolphins, sperm whales and albatrosses off the shore, then indulge in a feast of fresh crayfish, mussels, blue cod and more. Land lovers can take a wilderness walk through the untamed and dramatic Kaikoura forest. Franz Josef glacier, This glacier, located within Westland National Park in the southwest, is one of the world’s most accessible. Visitors can walk right up to the foot of the massive glacier or take a helicopter ride over the dazzling Ice Age remnant. Together with Fox Glacier it is one of South Westland’s major drawcards for tourists.

Who can apply for NZ eTA application? Citizens from eTA New Zealand eligible countries can obtain an eTA for New Zealand (NZ) by completing a simple online application form. The New Zealand eTA (NZ eTA) visa is valid for a period of 2 years and can be used for multiple visits. Applicants can apply for NZ eTA from their mobile, tablet, PC or computer and receive it in their email inbox by using this New Zealand eTA application form. Read extra info on New Zealand eTA Application.

All the follow up of the application is managed by our experts, and approved eTA documents are sent by email with detailed information and tips on how to use the eTa in order to successfully enter the destination country. We are a private website and are not affiliated with the New Zealand Government. Our services have a fee for our professional travel support. Applicants may process their application directly through the New Zealand Government website for a lesser fees.

In the sunny region of Hawke’s Bay, Napier is famous for its gourmet food and Art Deco architecture. After a powerful earthquake destroyed the town in 1931, it was rebuilt in the Spanish Mission style and Art Deco design for which Miami Beach is also famous. Today, visitors can take self-guided tours to view these buildings, some of which are embellished with Maori motifs. Along the Marine Parade seafront promenade lies the town’s famous statue from Maori mythology called Pania of the Reef. Napier is also a haven for foodies. Gourmet restaurants here specialize in using fresh produce from the region, and the town plays host to popular farmers’ markets. Nearby attractions include hiking trails and the gannet colony at Cape Kidnappers.

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