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A few tips about welding equipment, MIG and TIG welders, plasma cutters. When appearance counts, TIG welding creates a high quality, clean weld that is far less likely to distort the metal by using a nonconsumable tungsten electrode. There is no need to worry about splatter because it only uses the necessary amount of filler metal needed in the welding puddle, making for the highest quality weld in every respect. However, TIG is fairly specialized and requires a good deal of training in order to master it—so make sure any TIG welder purchase is paired with a plan to take welding classes. Instead of the point and shoot simplicity of MIG welding, TIG requires the use of a foot pedal to regulate the welding process. A filler rod that is separate from the torch that must be fed in gradually. Many professional welders prefer TIG because it can weld a wide variety of metals and because of the versatility of argon gas used during TIG welding. There is no slag to block the view of the weld puddle. Argon gas can weld any metal at any thickness with TIG welding, and therefore there is no need to change the gas depending on the project.

Top welding tips: how to become a better welder and how to pick the best welding equipment. For DCEN welding on steels, 1/16″ will work in the 20 to 100 amp rage as long as you prep it right. If you are using 20 amps, you will need a needle sharp point to get good crisp arc starts. At 100 amps, you might not want quite a needle sharp point or you might be putting a smidge of tungsten in the weld. You need a blunter taper. Some charts extend the range to 150 amps for 1/16, but I think that’s way too much. Why not just swap to a 3/32 at that amperage.? 3/32″ is good from about 65 – 200 amps. And 1/8″ 2% thoriated electrodes are good in the 85 – 300 amp range. ( Drop all these numbers by about 30% for A/C) Using helium mixed with the argon will also change the recommended currents because the arc is hotter with the same amps. These recommendations are from down and dirty experience and don’t come from a chart. Most charts I have seen tell you a 1/16 tungsten is good all the way to 150 amps…Please.

Many companies get completely “bogged down” in the paperwork required to run a business. But with today’s latest technological advances, there are items that can be a great help. For instance, Lincoln Electric offers something called ArcWorks software which can document procedures, create drawings everyone in the shop can access, keep track of welding operator’s qualifications, and many other things. Software such as this can be tailored to the individual company’s needs and provide great efficiencies and also eliminate mistakes. Adding Robotics or Hard Automation to the Operation: Today’s technological advances offer many options. Robotics can be justified when the volume of parts a company produces is so great that it can offset the monies spent on a robot. Robotics can also be considered if there are a number of different parts that are similar enough in nature to be able to be handled by the same robot. If robots are not justified, a company might determine that fixturing or hard automation could be used to increase efficiency or quality. One company incorporated fixturing and clamps to hold down a tank while the seam was being welded. In another case, an automotive manufacturer decided that automation was necessary because of the amount of parts and intricate angles and welding positions. Searching for the best Welding Equipment? We recommend Welding Supplies Direct & associated company TWS Direct Ltd is an online distributor of a wide variety of welding supplies, welding equipment and welding machine. We supply plasma cutters, MIG, TIG, ARC welding machines and support consumables to the UK, Europe and North America.

Put a vent hole in anything you weld that will be sealed up completely: Put a vent hole in anything you weld that will be sealed up completely or air will heat up and expand and blow away your shielding gas or even blow out at the end of the weld bead. Some machined joints that are sealed on one end will not even allow you to start welding because the fit is so good that the part is air tight before you even weld. Other machined parts where a part is pressed in and bottomed out can give cracking problems because there is no where for the part to shrink. If you have to weld something that has been pressed in and bottomed out, make sure to add more filler metal than average to tacks and the final weld bead. That is to prevent the cracking that happens when you run a concave bead and the metal has nowhere to shrink.

The welding setup, welder settings, and electrode selection will impact how fast welders can work. Industrial welders invest time in planning the size and shape of their welding areas, how parts are laid out, and how they supply their shielding gas. Testing settings or an electrode on a piece of scrap metal, especially for a beginners, will save time in the long run. Learn more about setting up an efficient shop here. Welding Downhill Increases Welding Speed: While welding downhill is a faster way to weld, it’s not as strong as welding uphill. On most projects it’s not worth sacrificing strength and durability for the sake of welding speed. However, if the metal is thin enough, then welding downhill won’t make the weld weaker and may even be the correct technique for the job. Learn about uphill and downhill welding and see these diagrams of vertical and downhill welding.

Contact tips can have a significant impact on MIG welding performance since this consumable is responsible for transferring the welding current to the wire as it passes through the bore, creating the arc. The position of the contact tip within the nozzle, referred to as the contact tip recess, is just as important. The correct contact recess position can reduce excessive spatter, porosity, insufficient penetration, and burn-through or warping on thinner materials. While the ideal contact tip recess position varies according to the application, a general rule of thumb is that as the current increases, the recess should also increase.

First, practice handling the gun without actually welding. Rest its barrel in one hand, and support that hand on the table. The other hand operates the gun’s trigger. Stand in a comfortable position and move the gun steadily over the work surface. Adjust your posture and gun movement so that they feel natural. Attach the work lead to the workpiece, and hold the gun so the wire meets the weld surface at about a 30-degree angle. Touch the wire very lightly to the surface, squeeze the trigger, and gently pull the gun toward you to make your first test weld. The wire should melt off into the weld puddle at an even rate and make a steady crackling noise as you go. Adjust the welder settings if needed. Source: https://www.weldingsuppliesdirect.co.uk/.

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